Tooth Sensitivity After a Crown or Bridge: Causes and Treatment Options

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02 Jun 2022

Tooth Sensitivity After a Crown or Bridge: Causes and Treatment Options

If you have ever experienced a sharp twinge of pain when eating or drinking something hot, cold, sweet, or acidic, then you know firsthand how uncomfortable tooth sensitivity can be. While this issue is relatively common, it can still be frustrating to deal with – especially if you just got a brand-new crown or bridge. So, what causes this sensitive tooth after a crown or bridge? And what can be done to treat it? Keep reading to find out.

Main Causes of Tooth Sensitivity

There are a few different reasons why you may experience sensitivity after getting a crown or bridge. One possibility is that the tooth underneath the crown or bridge is still slightly decayed. This can happen if the decay was not completely removed before the crown or bridge was placed. Another possibility is that the gum tissue around the crown or bridge is inflamed. This is often due to improper placement of the crown or bridge, which can put too much pressure on the gums and cause them to become irritated. Finally, it’s also possible that the tooth itself is sensitive. This can happen if the tooth was damaged during the procedure or if the root was exposed during the placement of the crown or bridge.

How to Reduce Sensitive Tooth Pain

There are a few things you can do to help prevent sensitivity after getting a crown or bridge.

First, be sure to brush and floss regularly. This will help to remove any plaque or tartar that could cause irritation to the gums.

Use a toothpaste for sensitive teeth instead of your regular one. These toothpastes contain ingredients that help to block the receptors in your teeth that are responsible for sending pain signals to your brain.

Besides that, you can try to use a fluoride mouthwash or rinse. Fluoride helps to strengthen the tooth enamel, which can help to reduce sensitivity.

You should also avoid eating or drinking anything that is extremely hot, cold, sweet, or acidic. These can all aggravate sensitive teeth.

When to See a Dentist

If you find that your sensitivity is still not improving after 2-4 weeks, or if it is becoming worse, you should contact your dentist. They will be able to determine the cause of your sensitivity and recommend the best course of treatment.

In some cases, your dentist may recommend a different type of toothpaste or mouthwash. They may also suggest that you use a soft-bristled toothbrush and be gentle when brushing your teeth. Occasionally, you may also need to have the crown or bridge adjusted. In more severe cases, your dentist may recommend a Root Canal Procedure. This procedure is performed to remove the damaged or exposed nerve tissue from your tooth. Once the nerve tissue is removed, your tooth will no longer be sensitive.

If you are having a crown or bridge placed, be sure to follow your dentist’s instructions for care. This will help to ensure that the procedure is done correctly and that your crown or bridge lasts for many years. Do you have any other questions about tooth sensitivity after a crown or bridge? We’re here to help. Give us a call or schedule an appointment today.